Blind Structure Calculator

There is nothing worse than setting up a tournament that people look forward to enjoying but the blinds go up too fast and it becomes an all-in festival in a very short amount of time. It will take a few times to become comfortable with a blind structure. My opinion on blind structures is that the majority of blinds schedules are way too high and the tourneys end up being crapshoots at the end. This section discusses some tournament blind structure theory, which explains why the PokerSoup. Although this is good for the aggressive players, it is not necessarily fair.

Blind increases

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The blind calculator tool below can take care of that and help set up your perfect structure. To calculate a blind structure, you need the starting blind level, the estimated total value of the tournament chips in play initial buy-ins plus rebuys and add-ons and the desired length of the tournament. Use the tool below to help set up your perfect structure.

This section discusses some tournament blind structure theory, which explains why the PokerSoup. Most tournaments start with big blinds. Anything around big blinds is considered a "deep stack" tournament. Deep stack tournaments are considered to be full of skillful poker play and not just pushing your money all in before the flop. The latter occurs quickly in tournaments that start with less than 50 big blinds, which are also aptly nick-named "luck-fests".

There just aren't enough chips to maneuver and play real poker. If all other variables are held constant, starting a tournament with larger chip stacks will increase the length of the game.

The number of rebuys and add-ons in a tournament also effect the total number of chips in play during a tournament. If no other changes are made, more rebuys and add-ons make for a longer tournament.

Most live tournaments employ blind level lengths of 15, 20, 30, 45, or 60 minutes. The blind calculator can calculate blinds for any of these blind levels.

With a set tournament length, longer blind levels result in less number of rounds and shorter blind levels result in more rounds. Advice about blinds At home games where you are having a series of mini-tournaments, the fast blind increases can be an asset because then everyone else will be sitting around waiting for the next game to start.

Most home games tend to be casual, and therefore there are fewer hands dealt per hour because of people talking and socializing. So the blinds may need to rise slower to adjust for this. Aggressive players, who are generally better players, prefer the higher blind structures because they reward aggressive play because the pots - relative to the average stack size - are much bigger.

Although this is good for the aggressive players, it is not necessarily fair. Sometimes, during home tournaments, the aggressive players will ask to raise the blinds, but blinds levels should be at a reasonable level to allow the average player room to play.

Keep in mind that even when the blinds are going up at the same percentage rate, the compounding nature of those raises means that the blinds are going up exponentially. It will take a few times to become comfortable with a blind structure. There is one major rule you should use when hosting a tournament for the first time - if you aren't sure what the blinds should be then set them low!

There is nothing worse than setting up a tournament that people look forward to enjoying but the blinds go up too fast and it becomes an all-in festival in a very short amount of time. Keep in mind that if you want to slow down the rate of increase, you can lengthen out the time intervals instead of adjusting the blinds.

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