Online Blackjack Strategy Trainer

I will take you by the hand and take away all of the mystery to becoming a rated player with your own VIP casino card. The absolute best way to lock up your profits session after session, day after day, until you have a continuous stream of predicable winnings! Views Read Edit View history. Insurance is invariably not a good proposition for the player, unless he is quite sure that there are an unusually high number of ten-cards still left undealt. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy.

How to Play Blackjack

Hand Value

In Australia and Malaysia , an unlicensed version of the game, with no dealer hole card and significant rule differences, is played in casinos under the name " Pontoon ". It was first introduced about The liberal rules of Spanish 21, though, do compensate for this. With optimal play, the house edge of a Spanish 21 table is lower than that of a blackjack table with the same rules on hitting or standing on soft The game also offers an optional "Match the Dealer" side bet, which compares a player's cards with the dealer's upcard.

Matching the rank of the dealer's card pays 4: A player may win on both cards; e. The following tables list the Spanish 21 house edges for all rule sets found in North America. The super bonus is averaged out to a These charts assume that the player is using basic strategy. Match the Dealer is a side bet offered on most Spanish 21 games. The player wins the side bet if the rank of either or both of their initial two cards matches the rank of the dealer's up card.

If the cards match in both rank and suit, the player wins a bigger payout. Counting cards essentially is the act of tracking the number of high and low-value cards used to better predict a more likely outcome on a particular hand. The blackjack rules assign numerical blackjack card values to every card.

When you play the house, you play against the casino, which is represented by the dealer. The dealer will then deal one card facing up to each player and then the house.

Each successive player then decides whether to hit or stand. After all the players have completed their hands or gone bust, the dealer reveals his or her hand. Some casinos, though, might declare a push to be either a loss or a win for the player. The dealer essentially plays by the same strict set of casino rules at all times. Those blackjack rules are designed to protect the house advantage over the long term by ensuring the dealer plays a simple, mistake-free game every time.

Over the long run, that means the house will earn a profit—no matter how many card players try to beat it over time. In fact, the more people try to beat the house, the more the house will win from those who are gambling without abiding by a similarly strict set of blackjack rules. If the card total is 16 points or lower, the dealer will always draw another card from the deck.

The dealer will continue drawing cards from the deck until the house hand has at least 17 points, or until it goes bust by going over If the dealer has 17 points off the deal without an Ace, most blackjack rules say the dealer will stand, even if a 21 player has a higher total.

The dealer also might have a soft 17 hand, which is one that includes an Ace and any other cards whose combined value totals six points.

Both land-based casinos and online blackjack casinos who support live dealer blackjack require dealers to take at least one more card with the dealer has a soft 17 showing. While playing blackjack, as soon as a player is dealt a winning hand, the house pays out immediately.

These games are the most unfavorable to the player and should be avoided. That makes it very important to ensure you know the house blackjack rules before you begin gambling. The table limits in blackjack vary from one casino to the next—both in land-based and online gambling casinos.

Most 21 gaming tables accommodate up to six players, but the cost of high-limit tables generally limits the number of players. Insurance essentially is a bet on whether or not the dealer has 21 right off of the deal, and requires players to lay half their initial wagers. If the dealer has 21, the house will pay the insurance bets at 2: That payoff will wipe out the loss from the initial wager. If the dealer does have 21, the player will lose the initial bet but will receive a 1: If both have 21, most blackjack rules say that is a push.

Some casino 21 rules, though, give ties to the dealer when it comes to a blackjack. In most cases, though, a push results in the player getting back his or her wager. If the dealer does not have blackjack, anyone who bought insurance will lose that amount, regardless how the rest of the hand plays out. It is important to note that players have a variety of options to choose from after their first two cards are dealt.

The decisions they make should take into account the cards held by other players at the table, as well as the dealer. In most cases, a player normally stands when the point value of their cards is between 16 and If a dealer has less than 17, they must continue drawing cards until they reach 17 or above, without going over If the scores of the player and the dealer are equal, the player receives their original bet back, and this is a push.

Should the dealer bust or go over 21 at any point, all the players at the table will win and receive a 1: Any player who had blackjack would have already been paid out at least 3: Depending on the casino, some will let players cut their losses by surrendering half their bets after the initial deal. An early surrender allows the player to surrender when a 10 or face card is drawn without checking the hole-card for blackjack.

That could be preferable if the dealer is showing a particularly strong hand, like an Ace. A late surrender allows the player to surrender after checking the hole-card, but before the dealer reveals his or her hand.

Many players view the early surrender as more favorable, especially if the dealer is showing an Ace. For example, virtually all players of 21 will split a pair of Aces by placing an additional bet to create two potentially winning hands.

After receiving two more cards, the player determines whether to hit or stand with each of the two hands he or she now has.

Depending on the cards dealt, splitting your cards can double your chances of hitting a blackjack. Splitting cards can also at least double your potential winnings from the same initial hand dealt. Most will not split a pair of cards worth 20 points, for example, while all will split a pair of Aces. Another popular play that could double your potential winnings—and losses—on a particular hand is the double down.

The double down allows you to double your wager after the initial bet, but you only get one more card. Many skilled players use a strict system based on statistical probability to determine the ideal times to double down.

As with splitting cards, that assessment includes what the dealer is showing off the deal, plus other cards that might already have gone into play. The number of decks used also affects the ideal strategy for playing 21 and considering when to double down on your bet.

Many casinos play by the traditional 21 rules that were once popular on the Las Vegas Strip, which is traditionally called American 21 Or Vegas Rules. These games are more common online and at small casinos that focus on locals. Yet, the game has many other versions with their own subtle rules changes.

The Aim of the Game and How to Play